Presentations from Innovative Educators

Please view the presentations from each available session of the Innovative Educators Summit below. If you have questions or need clarification, please don’t hesitate to contact us at marketing@hawkeslearning.com.

English Track

Opening Keynote: Innovation in Developmental Education | PowerPoint
—Peter Adams, Accelerated Learning Program (ALP)

Integrated Communication Arts in a Corequisite World | PowerPoint
—Dr. Sherry Wilson, Crowder College

Support through Print and Digital Resources in an English Classroom | PowerPoint
—Mary Kate Wilson and Mary Campbell, Greenville Technical College

Implementing Foundations of English into the Developmental Classroom | PowerPoint
—Mike Thompson and Joan Myers, North Iowa Area Community College

Additional Downloads from Mike and Joan:

  • Global/Linear Activity | PDF
  • Good Note Taking | PDF
  • Learning Style Inventory | PDF
  • Lessons |Word
  • Organization Problems Inventory | PDF

Math Track

Seven Years of Emporium: What We’ve Learned, How We’ve Adjusted, and Future Plans | PowerPoint
—Curtis Mitchell & Jim Cochran, Kirkwood Community College

Mini Session I: Boot Camp Courses Fast-Track Student Success in Math | PowerPoint
Mini Session II: Corequisite and Math Pathway Implementation | PowerPoint
—Amy Young and Brandon Ford, Navarro College

Implementing Corequisites to Support Math Pathways | PowerPoint
—Dr. Linda Goeller, Melissa Bryant, and Emily Carpenter, Seminole State College

Integrating Math Study Skills into Online and Classroom Courses | PowerPoint
—Dr. Paul Nolting, Academic Success Press

A College Algebra Success Story | PowerPoint
—Dr. John Taylor, University of North Carolina – Charlotte

An Emporium Approach to Intervention in Algebra | PowerPoint
—Jonathan Watkins and Kelly Boyd, The University of Louisville

Math Lab Setting with a Modular Curriculum | PowerPoint
—Ellen Oliver, New River Community College and Bob Parker, Rappahannock Community College

Scaling Math Pathways with Corequisite Courses | PowerPoint
—Shelley Parks, Dr. Garry Sigler, and Heather Turner, Texas State Technical College – Waco

 

Both Math and English

Using Data to Improve Curricula and Pedagogy | PowerPoint
—Dr. Tristan Denley, Chief Academic Officer of the University System of Georgia

Strategies for Academic Success In New Editions – Free Download Included

Preparation for College Mathematics and Developmental Mathematics new edition textbooks

The National Student Clearinghouse® Research Center™ studied a cohort of more than 2.2 million degree-seeking students who first started college in fall 2011 (both at 2-year and 4-year institutions in the U.S.). Six years later, 43.1% of that cohort had not completed their degree.*

Oftentimes, low completion rates are due to students not accessing the right resources or having the necessary study skills. Not all students enter your math class adequately prepared to juggle the responsibilities of both the course and their general college experience.

Hawkes wants to set students up for success — that’s why the new editions of Developmental Mathematics and Preparation for College Mathematics offer Strategies for Academic Success, an entire section devoted to preparing students for the challenges they may face and the skills they’ll need to acquire to aid them throughout their academic careers.

View the Strategies for Academic Success here.

The Strategies for Academic Success cover the following:

  1. How to Read a Math Text
  2. Tips for Success in a Math Course
  3. Tips for Improving Math Test Scores
  4. Practice, Patience, and Persistence!
  5. Note Taking
  6. Do I Need a Math Tutor?
  7. Tips for Improving Your Memory
  8. Overcoming Anxiety
  9. Online Resources
  10. Prepare for a Final Math Exam
  11. Managing Your Time Effectively

 

 

Are these skills important to your students’ success? If so, request your exam copy of either Developmental Mathematics or Preparation for College Mathematics today!


*Shapiro, D., Dundar, A., Huie, F., Wakhungu, P.K., Yuan, X., Nathan, A. & Bhimdiwali, A. (2017, December). Completing College: A National View of Student Completion Rates – Fall 2011 Cohort (Signature Report No. 14). Herndon, VA: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

10 Habits to Help You Succeed in College – FREE PDF Included

The title of the document is Reading Environment Assessment. It asks you to one: list three places you usually study in order of frequency. Then, two: Circle the response that applies to each of these places (T for True and F for False). Statements are Other people seldom interrupt me when I study here; Little of what I can see here reminds me of things unrelated to my studying; and I don't hear a TV or radio when I study here.

Getting a college degree is no easy feat. Fortunately, you and your fellow students have access to a plethora of tips and tricks to make the most out of your class time and study time. One such source is provided by Opportunity International, which lists out habits to help you succeed in higher education.

Here’s a taste of Opportunity.org’s 10 Habits of Successful Students, which includes my favorite three habits they’ve listed:

  1. Sleep. You don’t want to overdo this one and miss class, of course! However, you can’t pull all-nighters to finish projects and study for tests all the time. (Trust me. I’ve tried and learned the hard way.) Get your rest so you can think more clearly, retain information more easily, and be a more pleasant person to be around.
  2. Ask questions. You should use this tip inside and outside of the classroom. If you’re confused by what your instructor is saying, do your best to speak up during class! If you’re extra shy and don’t want to talk in front of all your peers, don’t miss the opportunity to ask your instructor during their office hours or right after their lecture. Make sure you ask friends for help with studying too.
  3. Maintain a study space. Sometimes, your dorm room or home isn’t the best place to get your work done. Take the time to locate a spot that’s quiet, easy to get to, and conducive to studying.

Need help with that last tip? We’ve got you covered. Check out our Reading Environment Assessment here. It asks you to evaluate three different potential study spots by answering a few true-or-false questions. It will help you identify your best environment to get your work done. Plus, it’s free and quick to complete!

Check out more habits of successful students here. Let us know what your best habits are in the comments below!


“10 Habits of Success Students.” Opportunity International. Opportunity.org, n.d. Web. 19 July 2016.

Common causes of test anxiety and how to solve them

In “Text Anxiety: Causes and Remedies,” Dr. Maryellen Weimer addresses the issue of test anxiety and how it affects students from kindergarten to graduate school. She presents a study that confirms the general idea that those with test anxiety have lower cumulative GPAs at the college level, but reminds us that although this is the case, tests are not going to disappear from the college landscape. Thus, she focuses on the causes of test anxiety, summarized below:

  1. Students who don’t have good study skills resort to memorization, but in turn cannot apply that to the “big picture.”
  2. Students who engage in negative self-talk can answer the questions after the test; however, the testing experience provokes such a high level of anxiety that it clouds their judgment.
  3. Students who think they know how to study—but actually do not—spend a great deal of time going through the motions such as highlighting and recopying notes, but they end up retaining practically nothing.

Weimer suggests that teachers combat test anxiety by providing examples of how to study and discussion about test-taking amongst peers. She also presents findings of teacher behavior that increases test anxiety for their students—namely walking around, peering over shoulders, or talking during the exam.

Read the original Faculty Focus article here or below, and let us know what you think is the main cause (and best remedy!) of test anxiety.

Weimer, Maryellen. “Test Anxiety: Causes and Remedies.” Teaching Professor Blog. Faculty Focus, 27 April 2016. Web. 3 May 2016.

Quick Tips to Improve Attention Span

Shana Lebowitz highlights a few key ways you can increase your attention span, which will help with retaining the information you learn in class and studying for those midterms that will be here soon enough! According to her research, “the average human attention span was 12 seconds in the year 2000 — but it decreased to eight seconds by 2013. That’s one second shorter than a goldfish’s” (Lebowitz). That’s pretty nuts.

We list out our favorite five tips below, but click here to view the full article and read about those other six tips!

Increase your attention span by…

  1. Listening carefully to music – Don’t just listen to music in the background while you’re doing other things. Commit to listening to a few songs and really concentrating on just that task.
  2. Using the buddy system – Try studying with a friend! Seeing another person being productive will help influence you to stay productive too. Just make sure you save your thoughts about the latest GoT episode to share after your study session; otherwise, your study to-do list will grow longer than Khaleesi’s title.
  3. Working out – Grab those study buddies and turn them into your workout buddies too!
  4. Standing up – Taking a break from sitting can help you concentrate harder.
  5. Meditating – Lower your stress levels and boost your cognitive abilities by focusing on your breathing and reining your wandering thoughts in ever so gently.

Lebowitz, Shana. “11 easy ways to boost your concentration.” Business Insider. Business Insider, 29 Sept. 2015. Web. 5 Oct. 2015.