Robust Feedback within English Courseware

Hawkes Learning’s Practice mode gives students ample feedback when they answer questions incorrectly. Several different tutorial options are available to students, including Explain Error, which provides error-specific feedback immediately when the mistake is made; Hint, which gives students a clue as to how they can answer the question correctly if they’re still struggling; and Solution, which states the correct answer.

Students can then try a similar question in order to test their knowledge. Once they feel comfortable with the material in Practice, students move on to the Certify mode, which does not provide learning aids in order to hold students accountable for their learning.

Check out two examples of the robust feedback provided in Practice below:

In Foundations of English‘s Chapter 4: Grammar and Mechanics, the courseware asks the following:

Does the following sentence use pronoun-antecedent agreement? Select the best answer.

Damien is running for class president, and his sister is helping them with the campaign.

The two choices are the following:
  • Yes, this sentence uses pronoun-antecedent agreement.
  • No, this sentence does not use pronoun-antecedent agreement.

If students select the first answer, the courseware provides this feedback:

Explain Error

Your Answer: Yes, this sentence uses pronoun-antecedent agreement.

You were asked to determine if the following sentence uses pronoun-antecedent agreement:

Damien is running for class president, and his sister is helping them with the campaign.

 

Your answer is incorrect because the pronoun is plural and neutral, but the antecedent is singular and male.

For a hint to solve this problem, select Hint.

Hint

You were asked to determine if the following sentence uses pronoun-antecedent agreement:

Damien is running for class president, and his sister is helping them with the campaign.

 

Remember, for a pronoun and its antecedent to agree, they must have the same gender and number. The gender of words can be female, male, or neutral. The number is either singular or plural.

If an antecedent is neutral and refers to a person or animal, it can be used with a male or female pronoun based on the other information in the sentence. However, inanimate objects do not have gender, so they are always renamed with neutral pronouns.

Take a look at the following sentence that includes both a pronoun and its antecedent:

Jennifer always makes the dessert because she is the best baker.

The pronoun she agrees with its antecedent Jennifer (the noun it renames). Both words are singular in number and female in gender. This is what you look for when checking for pronoun-antecedent agreement.

 

Solution

You were asked to determine if the following sentence uses pronoun-antecedent agreement:

Damien is running for class president, and his sister is helping them with the campaign.

The following answer is correct:

No, this sentence does not use pronoun-antecedent agreement.

The pronoun them is plural and neutral, but the antecedent Damien is singular and male.


In Foundations of English‘s Chapter 5: Style, the courseware asks the following:

Read the following passage.

People from all across the country enter the contest, and they all want their own shot at fame. Fame is fleeting, but these people do not care. They all believe they will be “the next big thing.” Even when disappointment comes crashing down on them, they still struggle and claw their way back up. Being content is not something humans are good at.
 
 
Which sentences do not use coordination to join clauses? Select all that apply.

Click on a word or word group to make a selection. To undo, click on the selection again. Alternatively use the Tab and spacebar to select or deselect the word or word group.

Students receive error-specific feedback when they select the following sentence from the passage: Even when disappointment comes crashing down on them, they still struggle and claw their way back up.

Use this grammar diagnostic test to target which lessons students must master.

Customize the way students learn.

Save class time and identify individual areas of weakness for remediation with Hawkes Learning’s free grammar diagnostic test! Click through a demonstration of the test at your own pace.

This 50-question assessment identifies areas of proficiency and specific knowledge gaps for individual students. A customized curriculum is developed for each student to strengthen their grammar skills and eliminate those errors from their writing.

A report shows student progress in both a pie chart and bar graph. The part of the graphs in green represents the number of correct answers, while pink represents the number of incorrect answers. The bar graph breaks down each lesson number.

The tailored learning path through the grammar curriculum provides students the opportunity to learn, practice, and then master each topic. Let Hawkes assist you in ensuring these skills become second nature for your students, helping them become more effective communicators of their ideas.

While diagnostic tests are pre-created to save you time for both Hawkes Learning’s Foundations of English and English Composition courses, you can also customize either by removing or adding questions based on your own lesson objectives.

As you click through the demonstration here, you’ll see how students access their assessment, answer questions, and receive a performance breakdown of each topic covered in the test.


Want to see more? Contact your Hawkes courseware specialist at 1-800-426-9538 or sales@hawkeslearning.com today!

Additional Questions in English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for English Composition. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to different parts of the essay, critical reading & writing skills, and more. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
1.1 12
13
14
15
1.2 11
12
13
14
15
1.3 11
12
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14
15
1.4 11
12
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14
15
1.5 11
12
13
1.6 11
12
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14
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1.7 11
12
13
14
15
1.8 11
12
13
14
15
1.9 14
15
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
2.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.1 11
12
13
14
15
3.2 11
12
13
14
15
3.3 13
14
15
3.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.5 11
12
13
14
15
3.6 11
12
13
14
15
4.1 11
12
13
14
15
4.2 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 11
12
13
14
15
4.4 11
12
13
14
15
4.5 11
12
13
14
15
4.6 11
12
13
14
15
5.1 11
12
13
14
15
5.2 13
14
15
5.3 11
12
13
14
15
5.4 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
5.5 11
12
13
14
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5.6 11
12
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14
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5.7 11
12
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14
15
5.8 11
12
13
14
15
5.9 11
12
13
14
15
5.10 11
12
13
14
15
6.1 6
7
8
9
10
6.2 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
6.3 11
12
13
14
15
6.4 11
12
13
14
15
6.5 6
7
8
9
10
6.6 11
12
13
14
15
6.7 11
12
13
14
15
6.8 6
7
8
9
10
7.1 9
10

FREE download: Foundations of English Textbook

Our Foundations of English textbook puts learning directly into students’ hands. It helps your students gain a thorough understanding of study skills, critical thinking, reading, and writing.

This engaging text, which is a hybrid between a traditional textbook and a workbook, has been designed specifically for students at the foundational English level. The reading level is accessible; the instruction is practical; and the examples are relevant and engaging. The text challenges students to apply the course content to school, work, and everyday life.

Check out the first chapter here.

Pair the Foundations of English text with the accompanying online courseware so students have full access to practice questions, interactive examples, and our user-friendly peer review tool called SmartReview.

Introducing SmartReview: The All-in-One Paper Submission and Review Platform

You and your students have an all-in-one platform for managing, submitting, and reviewing student writing with SmartReview.

This tool, available in the Foundations of English and English Composition online courseware, helps instructors organize all writing submissions across different sections and create a space for effective peer reviewing. For students, it offers a digital writing space that interweaves multi-step assignments with individualized, instructor-directed feedback.

Access SmartReview directly from your online Hawkes Grade Book, then create a new writing assignment and include peer and/or instructor review, customized point values, and an optional rubric. You can set up assignments for as many sections as you’d like:

A tab called Assign is opened with two sections listed and buttons underneath the Actions column.

With just one login, students access their writing assignments you’ve created through SmartReview from their online Hawkes courseware. They have a user-friendly writing space where they can type their papers directly or copy and paste from any word processor. This space saves student work every few minutes in order to assure work will not get lost.

Once a writing assignment is submitted, it’s ready for instructor review.

Three rows are shown with different essays submitted. One column explains the type of essay (peer-to-peer upload, peer-to-peer review, and peer-to-instructor review). The next row shows a number of submissions, then the status of approved or graded. The row actions, all the way on the right, has buttons to open the paper.

That’s right—no need to rummage through your folders to track down the last page that ripped off a student’s paper. Take a break from refreshing your email inbox in the hopes that those last few students really did submit their papers before the 12-o’clock deadline. With SmartReview, you can just log into your online Hawkes Grade Book and see who submitted what and when, and you can easily read their edits and suggestions.

A student's paper is displayed with some text highlighted. A panel on the left shows two student names. Below the paper, a rubric is filled out grading focus and clarity, word choice, organization, and grammar and mechanics.

If you’ve created a peer review assignment, take advantage of the comments and tags! The comments give students space to provide more in-depth explanations of their feedback.

Dual panel shows comments and tags like "description," "evidence," and "wordy sentence" on the left and a student paper's text on the right. Some of the text is highlighted.

Tags help guide students’ assessment of writing. Students highlight a word, phrase, or sentence and select a tag—such as Topic Sentences or Punctuation—to classify their feedback. These tags help both the reviewers and writers understand key concepts in grammar that you’ve gone over in class by applying them to another’s work and seeing how often they make these grammatical errors in their own papers.

You can approve a paper that is submitted for peer review. Once a student submits a peer review, you also have the ability to approve the feedback before it is available to the writer.

As you read through the comments and tags, both you and your students can filter by category—like Grammar and Mechanics—to pinpoint areas needing improvement and areas of strength. Students will then be able to revise their assignments before submitting final drafts. They can always keep track of where they are in submitting their assignments with the progress bar:

The progress bar shows the peer-to-peer upload is past due, as are the peer-to-peer review and the peer-to-instructor review.

While using SmartReview, students show themselves that writing isn’t about cobbling together a paper at 2 a.m. the night before it’s due. Writing involves planning, creating drafts, sharing thoughts, revising, and continuously working toward becoming a better writer.

Instructors can schedule a virtual demonstration here.


Two iPads are shown. One screen says Foundations of English, and the other screen says English Composition.
In collaboration with English instructors across the country, Hawkes offers Foundations of English and English Composition covering reading, writing, and critical thinking.

The courseware allows you to individualize assessment and remediation, automate homework, and add to the multimedia-rich content.

 

If you’d like to learn more, contact your Courseware Specialist at 1-800-426-9538.

You beta believe Foundations of English is no longer in beta!

Last year, we were thrilled to announce the beta release of our first English course, Foundations of English. Now, we’re even more excited to announce that it’s no longer in its beta version!

Ready for the fall term, this courseware has even more questions, images, diverse examples, and interactive exercises to help students engage with your learning goals.

What have we added? We now have over 100 interactive examples so students have a more hands-on approach to their learning — check out one below!

The question example is called On Your Own, and the directions state the following: Use the following table to think about significant experiences in your own life. In the "Moment" column, write short descriptions of personal experiences or moments. In the "Outcome" column, write about how your life or someone else's was changed by that experience. Below the directions is a table with two rows: the first is labeled Moment with space below to type in, and the second is titled Outcome with space below to write in. Below the table is a button that says Print Table.

We have a wider range of question types as well, such as click-to-select questions. Instead of only having multiple choice questions to assign, you can mix things up in your curriculum by adding more of what you see below in this example:

Instructions read: Click to select. Read the paragraph below and click on the sentence that contains the climactic point. Below that are two paragraphs. First paragraph: I walked through the cold, crowded streets, hands shoved in my pockets, hoping to make it home before dark. Strangers passed by, shoving, shoving, but never looking me in the eye. I turned right on Helm Street, and was greeted with an angry specimen of a man. His frustration over our near-collision didn't seem to match the crime itself. I bumbled a pathetic apology and picked up the pace to my apartment. Almost there, almost there. Almost avoid... Second paragraph reads: And then, with one quick turn, I'm hit with the image crowding my nightmares: my grim, fading face staring back at me in the mirror, mercilessly exposing my sickness and decay through the store windows. It's unavoidable, I realize, as I throw myself down on the couch and prepare for the evening's practiced routine of medication and loneliness. Directions below that paragraph state the following: Click a sentence to highlight, then check your answer. Below is a button that says Check me.

Plus, we have a whole new lesson! That’s right—we’ve created Lesson 2.4: “Deconstructing Topics, Ideas, and Details” based on contributors’ feedback this past year. This lesson breaks down the components of a paragraph to provide students with direction as they practice reading on their own.

Speaking of contributors’ feedback, we compiled it all and let it guide our restructuring of the table of contents. We reordered a few lessons and changed the wording of some from the beta version. Check out the full release’s table of contents for Foundations of English below:

Chapter 1: Study Skills
1.1 Understanding Different Learning Styles
1.2 Determining Your Personal Learning Styles
1.3 Understanding and Reducing Stress
1.4 Keeping Yourself Organized
1.5 Managing Your Time Effectively
1.6 Taking Notes and Annotating Texts
1.7 Using Effective Study Strategies
1.8 Reducing Test Anxiety
1.9 Taking Advantage of Campus Resources
Chapter 2: Reading Skills
2.1 Preparing Yourself to Read
2.2 Using Visual Clues
2.3 Reading Actively and Purposefully
2.4 Deconstructing Topics, Ideas, and Details
2.5 Identifying Organizational Patterns
2.6 Using Context for Unfamiliar Words or Phrases
2.7 Using Word Parts for Unfamiliar Words
2.8 Making Inferences About a Text
2.9 Recognizing Types of Main Ideas and Evidence
Chapter 3: Critical Thinking
3.1 Identifying Purpose and Tone
3.2 Analyzing Argumentation Strategies
3.3 Identifying Bias
3.4 Evaluating Evidence
3.5 Understanding the Basics of Logic
3.6 Recognizing Logical Fallacies
3.7 Analyzing and Evaluating Visuals
Chapter 4: Grammar and Mechanics
4.1 Understanding Nouns
4.2 Understanding Pronouns
4.3 Understanding Verbs
4.4 Understanding Adjectives and Adverbs
4.5 Understanding Prepositions
4.6 Understanding Conjunctions and Interjections
4.7 Identifying the Characteristics of Sentences
4.8 Identifying Common Sentence Errors
4.9 Using Consistent Subjects and Verbs
4.10 Using Consistent Pronouns and Antecedents
4.11 Using Correct Pronoun Reference and Case
4.12 Using Commas
4.13 Using Semicolons and Colons
4.14 Using Apostrophes
4.15 Using Quotation Marks, Parentheses, and Brackets
4.16 Using Ellipses, Hyphens, and Dashes
4.17 Using Capitalization and Italics
4.18 Using Abbreviations and Numbers
4.19 Using Basic Spelling Rules
4.20 Spelling Commonly Confused Words
4.21 Proofreading Sentences for Grammar
Chapter 5: Style
5.1 Determining a Writing Style
5.2 Using an Appropriate Tone
5.3 Maintaining Consistency in Tense and Person
5.4 Correcting Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers
5.5 Using Word and Sentence Variety
5.6 Using Parallelism, Coordination, and Subordination
5.7 Using Active and Passive Voice
5.8 Emphasizing Words or Phrases
5.9 Choosing Clear, Concise, and Vivid Words
5.10 Using Inclusive Language
5.11 Proofreading Sentences for Style
Chapter 6: Writing Paragraphs
6.1 The Writing Process for Paragraphs
6.2 Choosing a Topic and Scope for a Paragraph
6.3 Writing a Topic Sentence
6.4 Choosing an Organizational Pattern
6.5 Drafting a Paragraph
6.6 Revising and Editing a Paragraph
6.7 Submitting a Paragraph
Chapter 7: Writing Longer Texts
7.1 Preparing to Write a Longer Text
7.2 Understanding Genre and Purpose
7.3 Choosing a Topic and Scope for a Longer Text
7.4 Writing a Thesis or Purpose Statement
7.5 Organizing and Outlining a Longer Paper
7.6 Writing with Technology
7.7 Writing a First Draft
7.8 Using Paragraphs Effectively
7.9 Revising a Longer Text
7.10 Participating in Peer Review
7.11 Submitting a Longer Text
Chapter 8: Research
8.1 Researching and Writing Responsibly
8.2 Making a Research Plan
8.3 Organizing the Research Process
8.4 Identifying Types of Sources
8.5 Evaluating the Credibility of Sources
8.6 Applying MLA Styles and Formatting