Additional Questions in Foundations of English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for Foundations of English. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to reading skills and grammar & mechanics. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
4.6 15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
4.7 18
19
20
4.8 12
13
14
15
16
4.12 19
20
5.6 30

Additional Questions in English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for English Composition. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to different parts of the essay, critical reading & writing skills, and more. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
1.1 12
13
14
15
1.2 11
12
13
14
15
1.3 11
12
13
14
15
1.4 11
12
13
14
15
1.5 11
12
13
1.6 11
12
13
14
15
1.7 11
12
13
14
15
1.8 11
12
13
14
15
1.9 14
15
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
2.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.1 11
12
13
14
15
3.2 11
12
13
14
15
3.3 13
14
15
3.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.5 11
12
13
14
15
3.6 11
12
13
14
15
4.1 11
12
13
14
15
4.2 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 11
12
13
14
15
4.4 11
12
13
14
15
4.5 11
12
13
14
15
4.6 11
12
13
14
15
5.1 11
12
13
14
15
5.2 13
14
15
5.3 11
12
13
14
15
5.4 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
5.5 11
12
13
14
15
5.6 11
12
13
14
15
5.7 11
12
13
14
15
5.8 11
12
13
14
15
5.9 11
12
13
14
15
5.10 11
12
13
14
15
6.1 6
7
8
9
10
6.2 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
6.3 11
12
13
14
15
6.4 11
12
13
14
15
6.5 6
7
8
9
10
6.6 11
12
13
14
15
6.7 11
12
13
14
15
6.8 6
7
8
9
10
7.1 9
10

New Viewing Life Mathematically Questions to Add to Your Curriculum

Before the fall term kicks off, we’ve added more than 80 new questions to the Viewing Life Mathematically question bank.

To see the new questions, please log into your Grade Book, navigate to Assignments tab > Curriculum, and open Assignment Builder by choosing a hyperlinked lesson. These questions are labeled by case numbers so that they’re easy to identify.

Below is a list of the lessons, case numbers, and topics covered by these new questions:

Lesson Case Number Topics
1.1 11 and 12 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
1.2 11–13 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
2.1 13 and 14 Set Notation
2.2 14 Subsets and Venn Diagrams
2.3 11 Operations with Sets
2.4 11–14 Applications and Survey Analysis
3.1 9 Logic
3.2 6 Logic
3.3 12 and 13 Logic
3.4 9 Logic
3.4 10 and 11 Logic
4.1 10–13 Rates and Unit Rates
4.2 10 and 11 Ratios
4.3 12 and 13 Proportions and Percentages
4.4 11 Percentages
5.1 10–12 Functions
5.2 10–13 Linear Growth
5.3 13 and 14 Quadratics
5.4 9 and 10 Exponential Growth
5.5 10 and 11 Logarithmic Growth
6.1 13–17 Geometry
6.2 11–14 Geometry
7.1 11 and 12 Probability
7.3 11 and 12 Probability
7.4 11–14 Probability
7.5 11 and 12 Probability
8.1 7–11 Statistics
8.2 12 and 23 Statistics
9.1 11 and 12 Personal Finance
9.2 11 and 12 Personal Finance
9.3 10 Personal Finance
10.3 6–8 Voting and Apportionment
10.4 7–9 Voting and Apportionment
11.1 5 Applications of Geometry to the Arts
11.2 6 and 7 Tiling and Tessellations
12.2 8 Sports

Contact your Training & Support Specialist at 1-800-426-9538 if you need help adding these new questions to your lessons!

Tuesday Tip: Add shared Question Builder questions to assignments

Do you have a colleague who has mastered Question Builder and created some fantastic questions you’d like to use? As long as they’ve chosen the option to share these questions, you can incorporate them into your assignments too!

To input these questions into your own curriculum, follow these quick steps:

1. Log into your Grade Book.
2. Navigate to Assignments > Curriculum.
3. Open desired section (Or go to Manage by Curriculum and open desired curriculum).
4. Open desired lesson.
5. Select Question Bank > Instructor.

A drop-down menu shows the options

6. Folders will be listed below. Open the desired folder.

A list of questions for chapters is shown. They each are called

7. Add any desired questions to the assignment by dragging and dropping it into the right pane or selecting the checkbox and clicking Add Selected.

The button labeled

If you’d like to add questions from a shared folder to your WebTests, simply open up a WebTest (Assignments > WebTest) and follow steps 5-7.


If you have questions, please contact us at 1-800-426-9538
or connect with your Training and Support Specialist.

Shake things up in your next English class

Engaging students in your English class can get tricky, especially if reading and writing intimidate or overwhelm them. Some students may think they’re just not good writers, and they feel there’s little they can do to improve. Others may assume that they don’t need the skills they learn in English because their field of study is STEM-based. Still others may be so focused on getting a job after graduation that they feel disengaged from the academic life.

How do you break out of the box when it comes to teaching your English course in order to motivate all students to learn? Below are a few ideas to incorporate into your curriculum. Please let us know in the comments other fun projects that have achieved success in your class!

1. Get students engaged with their community. 

One project that gets students more involved with their writing than a traditional research paper or persuasive argument is one that connects students with a local nonprofit organization or charity. Before the term starts, reach out to local community-serving organizations to see if they’d allow students to visit and get involved by researching grants, interviewing employees and volunteers, and helping to apply to grants. You can also provide a list of local institutions and let students choose one to research and create several reports. For example, instructor Jim Wilcox did just that and had students visit the organizations and do their research before they wrote an objective report, an interview, an evaluation essay, an investigative report, and a letter to the editor of a local newspaper.

These kinds of projects get students thinking about how writing can help others and give students a sense of purpose through their work. Plus, these reports and evaluations are something that they’ll continue to create later on in life for other topics and organizations.

2. Have your class explore composition through media other than writing. (Then get them to write about it.)

Multimodal projects help students get a little more creative with their composition processes, especially those who aren’t comfortable with writing traditional academic papers. Giving them the freedom to explore a topic through a different medium—anything from creating a photo essay to shooting a short film to building a website—might just open up their imaginations and spark more creativity than they expected a school project could do.

Once students create their musical composition, video, dance piece, or project in a medium of their choosing, they can exercise their writing skills by writing a reflection of the process, why they decided on the kind of project they created, and the lessons learned along the way. Don’t be surprised if the written reflections mention how much students prefer this kind of project over others!

3. Test students’ abilities to distinguish fake websites from real ones.

“Fake news” seems to be a ubiquitous term these days. Do students understand how to distinguish true news articles and trustworthy sources from those that are false and misleading?

Center activities around analyzing arguments for their truth and effectiveness, as well as understanding what makes a source credible. On EasyBib’s blog, their in-house librarian Michele Kirschenbaum posted seven fake websites to share with students in order to test how well they evaluate a website’s credentials. You might want to give students these websites to look up, along with a few real sites, for a fun in-class activity that asks them to analyze the wording, design, links, and other elements of the websites to determine their authenticity. They can use these analytical skills next time their friend or family member shares a web article from a less-than-credible source.

4. Ask them to create a soundtrack to what they’re reading.

Engage students with the reading material by having them create a music playlist that matches the tone and emotions of the book or passage. Free music streaming services like Spotify allow easy access to millions of songs, and students can take advantage of these to build their own soundtracks to their readings. Doing so helps them pay more attention to the tone of the piece and become more aware of rising tension, foreshadowing, and more. They’ll begin to empathize more with the characters and identify with what they’re reading on a deeper level.

5. Hold a good old-fashioned debate on a current topic.

Anyone who reads the comments on any online post might feel like reasoning and critical thinking are in short supply these days. People seem to be arguing at each other and not making progress instead of discussing something and learning from one another. While the latter can’t happen all the time because we don’t live in a perfect world, we can still make it happen more frequently than it does!

On Inside Higher Ed’s website, John Duffy, an associate professor of English and the O’Malley Director of the University Writing Program at the University of Notre Dame, asserts that first-year writing programs offer a defense against our current post-truth culture by encouraging students to engage in fact-based discourse. Holding a debate in class gets students to think more critically about their opinions and gives them experience in expressing them through persuasive tactics and research. Maybe even award extra credit to students who take the time to research the opposing side of the argument and those who bring in quality news sources to back up their claims. You’ll be sure that they’ll use these skills throughout the rest of their lives.


What are some other projects that bring a unique spin to English and connect the subject to life post-graduation? We’d love to hear your ideas in the comments below!

 

Champlain College’s Unusual Core

Champlain College has a unique approach to earning a college degree. Instead of the typical fashion of enforcing general education requirements only for the first year or two of a student’s study before getting into degree-specific classes, this college integrates liberal arts classes within its pre-professional curriculum throughout all four years.

According to Colleen Flaherty’s “Plato in Marketing Class,” the college in Vermont uses what they call the vertical Core, which trains students for the professional world while providing them with an interdisciplinary general education program. When students enroll in their courses, they must take a gen. ed. course each semester. The first focuses on the self and community; the next concerns Western tradition; junior year explores global ideas like human rights; and the final one is a capstone course (Flaherty). Throughout their education, students find ways to connect what they learn in the liberal arts to their professionally geared courses, which makes their classroom experience richer and more appealing to potential employers upon graduation.

Find out more by reading the Inside Higher Ed article. Do you like this approach to education? Why or why not? Let us know in the comments!


Flaherty, Colleen. “Plato in Marketing Class.” Inside Higher Ed. Inside Higher Ed, 24 May 2016. Web. 26 May 2016.