Where’s the best place to study on your campus?

Finals are here! (That statement is exclaimed more in sheer panic than happy excitement.) Around this time of year, finding a good spot to review your materials before heading into that final exam or finishing that paper looming over your head is as difficult as imagining finally being done for the term.

Remember to ask yourself a few questions when choosing a study spot:

  • Can I easily get help if I get stuck on a problem or concept I’m studying?
  • Is it quiet and easy for me to concentrate on my work?
  • Am I comfortable here?
  • How far away is this space from where I live? From my next class? From snacks? (That last one is especially important.)
  • What resources are available to me here? Do I have access to whiteboards, computers, books, etc.?

We asked two of our Student Ambassadors what their favorite study spots are on their campuses. Take notice of where they choose! We hope you have a similar place to which you can retreat for some last-minute studying.

From Kayla at Navarro College:

This is the QEP Teams Center, where I work at on Navarro Campus. It’s a place where you can get help with a specific class and use your time to study here. While working here, I’ve had students tell me that their one-on-one time with me has helped them tremendously because I can easily break down each problem with them individually. I also find it useful studying here as well. I am here three to five times a week studying.

 

From Austin at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania:

Sometimes finding the right spot on campus to study is a challenge. The perfect spot that I have found for myself, though, is our project room. Located in the same building as the professors’ offices makes it a perfect place for being able to step out of the room and ask your professor a quick question. The project room is also for upperclassmen, so normally it is a quiet place to study away from distractions. With white boards all around the room, it makes it easy to write up ideas or even write out some long problems.

A computer lab with a long table in the middle and a white board on the furthest wall is shown.

Perhaps these favorite study spots from peers have inspired you to find a great place!

Meet Our Student Ambassadors

Hawkes Learning teams up with students across the country to help those who are new to using Hawkes. Through this internship, ambassadors meet with their peers to provide one-on-one guidance to answer many Hawkes questions, such as how to register a license number, where to go to complete homework, how to create a practice test, and what tools are the most helpful to get a good grade. Below are a few of the bright and talented students we work with!

 

**Details about spring 2017 ambassadors coming soon!**

Midterm Tips from a Student Ambassador

Here’s a guest post from UNC Charlotte’s Student Ambassador, Valeria! She provides some study tips during stressful midterms. Take it away, Valeria!


Study Tips for College Students from a College Student

Valeria Suárez

Hey, guys! Here are some study tips that will help you do better in school. Sometimes, it’s good to try new things if you aren’t getting the results you wanted regarding your grades. So, what’s better than trying a few tips below that have worked for others? Probably nothing. Just try them out and see the results:

1. Have study groups! For me, studying with my friends is one of the most helpful things for all my classes because you can help them, and they can help you. It’s a win-win situation, and it’s also fun!

2. BE ORGANIZED. This should be your mantra if you are a college student. Have calendars, a planner, and schedules. Do your best to keep them updated and accurate.

3. Create a study plan. When you feel that your week is too full and you are overwhelmed, write down everything you have to do and all the places you have to be in and make some kind of special schedule for that (or those) week(s). This will help you feel less stressed and will also give you the chance of making sure that you didn’t miss anything!

4. Find your study place. It is hard to study if you are in an environment that doesn’t suit you. Some people study in their rooms, while some people study in the library or in public places. It all depends on where you feel more comfortable/ Once you have found that spot, you will see the difference.

5. Feel confident when you start an exam. Some people say that if you get into that classroom thinking that you will get a score of 100, the probability of actually getting a good grade is higher.

6. Don’t study 10 minutes before the test. It won’t help you because you know what you already know and you won’t learn it 10 minutes before staring the test if you didn’t learned it before. So, prepare yourself to start studying with enough time before your test.

A Student Ambassador’s Midterm Guidance

Need some help for midterms? Follow the advice from UNLV’s Student Ambassador, Melanie! She lists some quick tips out below.


Study Tips

Melanie Arslanian

1. Find a peaceful and quiet place outdoors where you can study and look up on your breaks to enjoy the nature and de-stress.

2. Get healthy bite-sized snacks such as berries, nuts, and/or granola to keep your mind energized during long hours of studying.

3. Turn your cell phone off so you do not get distracted by unnecessary notifications.

4. Take breaks when you are studying and reward yourself. For example, after studying for thirty minutes, take a five-minute break. Do this throughout the day.

5. Try to make mnemonics to help you remember information when you’re studying. For example, a mnemonic device for the colors of the rainbow is Roy G. BIV.