Use this grammar diagnostic test to target which lessons students must master.

Customize the way students learn.

Save class time and identify individual areas of weakness for remediation with Hawkes Learning’s free grammar diagnostic test! Click through a demonstration of the test at your own pace.

This 50-question assessment identifies areas of proficiency and specific knowledge gaps for individual students. A customized curriculum is developed for each student to strengthen their grammar skills and eliminate those errors from their writing.

A report shows student progress in both a pie chart and bar graph. The part of the graphs in green represents the number of correct answers, while pink represents the number of incorrect answers. The bar graph breaks down each lesson number.

The tailored learning path through the grammar curriculum provides students the opportunity to learn, practice, and then master each topic. Let Hawkes assist you in ensuring these skills become second nature for your students, helping them become more effective communicators of their ideas.

While diagnostic tests are pre-created to save you time for both Hawkes Learning’s Foundations of English and English Composition courses, you can also customize either by removing or adding questions based on your own lesson objectives.

As you click through the demonstration here, you’ll see how students access their assessment, answer questions, and receive a performance breakdown of each topic covered in the test.


Want to see more? Contact your Hawkes courseware specialist at 1-800-426-9538 or sales@hawkeslearning.com today!

Best in the Nest: Jeff Humphrey

Jeff HumphreyJeff Humphrey is a lead instructor and professor in developmental math education at Wake Technical Community College (Raleigh, NC), where he’s worked since 2005. With experience ranging from tutoring in learning centers to teaching in the classroom, he has been teaching adults for 20 years.

Jeff has transitioned from being an effective traditional math instructor to finding success with the modular approach. However, he admits that success did not come easy! Jeff shared with us his thoughts on the modular courses he teaches and how he’s changed his teaching style over the years.

Jeff is featured in our new Best in the Nest section on our blog because of his fresh approach to challenges in education, as well as the care and effort he puts into his profession to help students succeed.

Can you tell me a little bit about your background?

I have two master’s degrees: one in divinity from Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, and one in adult education from NC State. I’ve taught lecture courses face-to-face, as well as tutored online courses. I’ve taught at a learning center at a junior college and at the learning center at Wake Tech. Since coming back to Wake Tech in 2005, I’ve been teaching developmental math.

How has your learning center experience impacted your current teaching?

Learning centers prepare you to be able to teach at any given instance. In a learning center, you have people covering a very wide gamut of understanding. They could be in a prealgebra class or doing differential equations, and at a moment’s notice you have to change gears and reach the level where they are.

That experience helps a great deal with working within a modular style because you’re bringing in that skill set. In a modular course, students aren’t necessarily grouped together according to the topics they’re learning—one might be solving equations while another is doing word problems with inequalities. The approach is flexible, and individuals are learning at their own pace.

How do students of diverse backgrounds benefit from the courses you teach?

Being modular means you’re getting students into the math they need more quickly because you’re only giving them the math they need. It helps students with diverse backgrounds because you’ll have a medical coding student who only needs prealgebra unit conversions, as well as a student who’s going into engineering who needs to get Algebra 2 material out of the way.

We can focus on the math that students need at that moment in time—nothing more, nothing less. That enables students to progress more quickly toward their degree.

What are some different needs of developmental math students compared to those in college algebra or higher?

Victim mentality is an issue. Many developmental students have struggled and haven’t seen success. What has happened is they see themselves as a victim, and they get flustered to the point that they don’t know what they should do in order to be successful. For some, it’s a matter of coming alongside and helping them realize they’re no longer looking for a solution; they’re digging a hole deeper and deeper.

A lot of that comes into play with learning how to ask for help. Students are so flustered that they no longer feel comfortable asking for help when they’re spinning their wheels and getting stuck. Sometimes they keep trying the same thing and hoping that trying the same thing will magically help them get out of the rut.

I come in and let students know they can call or stop by the office. I even sometimes walk students down to the Individualized Learning Center on campus. They see that the tutors there are people too, and we get them comfortable in a new situation where they can get help.

What do you think is the most difficult part of a modular course setup for students?

Some older students are expecting that traditional course when they sign up, and then they’re a little shocked when they see the emporium style in a large lab and everyone working at their own pace. They haven’t experienced that dynamic before and may feel overwhelmed. You can help them get over that initial nervousness by explaining that something new and different can be better! You get them to understand they’re focusing just on the material they need to get into the 100-level course.

Younger students sometimes have a hard time with flexible pacing. We work with a large group of students and help them with the time management hurdle.

Additionally, just like in a traditional class, students may be getting help from a website outside of class or they use a calculator to get the answer without understanding the math behind it. At times we require students to “show all work” so they can truly learn the math; instead of just getting an answer, they must understand the material.

With Hawkes, I can see the time students are putting in. For instance, I may see students who are making unbelievably fast time on a concept that even I couldn’t do that quickly, which lets me know they’re getting help outside with technology or another student. I have a one-on-one meeting to show the students I’m not working against them; I’m trying to help them see why they’re struggling and not passing quizzes so we can work together to get back on track.

Can you talk a little about the Success Meetings that you focus on in your webinar?

These meetings are one-on-one with a student. They’re nonjudgmental; they’re not “the teacher is out to get me.” It has to be more caring and personal than that.

At the first meeting, we diagnose the problem, then I work with the student to find a solution to help them improve as they go through the course. I wait for the fourth week of classes before meeting with students individually. I used to have the meetings earlier; however, when I thought I was encouraging them at this early stage, I was actually nagging them. I learned I needed to wait for the fourth, eighth, and twelfth weeks to check in.

For example, I worked with a student with a disability who had paperwork from Disability Services saying he takes about 1.5 times the amount of time it takes other students to complete the material. I did the averages for students getting through the homework, and I noticed that student was actually going 1.5 times faster than the average student.

I waited the four weeks, and then had the first round of testing. The student failed those quizzes and tests. When I met with him, I started talking to him about how he’s going 1.5 times faster, and I asked how he’s going more quickly. The student was a little shocked at first, then he eventually said he’s been going to an external website and using a graphing calculator to get the answers.

I let him know, “Hey, you have to put away the calculator and not go to the website; you have to allow yourself to struggle to learn. And if you’re struggling, come and ask me questions—that’s what I’m here for!”

So the student got more comfortable with that module and started going through at the average pace in the next module. He passed that quiz and test. In the final module—he sometimes went faster or slower—and on the second quiz he got a 100! He now learned what it took to be successful.

What’s one of the most rewarding parts of teaching for you?

I’m now building stronger relationships with students, and those continue after the students take my class. A former student who used to be terrified to get extra help stopped by my office the other day to say hi and check in. Several students email me and tell me how classes are going. They’re not asking for help—they’re just keeping in touch and letting me know what they’re up to. Some of them are getting ready to transfer to four-year institutions.

These relationships are developing more deeply compared to what I had before in traditional teaching, when I was the “sage on the stage.” Back then, I had the same jokes to tell, same lessons to teach…Now, each week is a new story and new situation. Students see me more as a mentor or coach.

Some of the students who don’t pass my class come back and apologize. They don’t want to let me down. I let them know they’ve got to keep going, that the only way to let yourself down is to not keep going and passing this hurdle you’re trying to overcome.

Interactive and Relevant Applications of Statistics

Hawkes statistics courses include games and simulations that help students apply key concepts to the world outside of the classroom. Check these out below! If you’re an instructor who would like to explore these games and simulations yourself, sign up for free student access today.

1. Games of Chance

gamesofchance2

Relevant Application:
This lesson helps students apply the concept of the expected value of a random variable to winning or losing games. Students develop a rational approach to analyzing decisions that involve risk. After all, many business decisions—such as purchasing new equipment, hiring additional employees, and expanding into new markets—involve some kind of risk, and students need to assess these situations as best as they can.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Basic probability distribution
  • Binomial distribution function
  • Hypergeometric distribution function

2. Direct Mail

directmail2

Relevant Application:
Even in today’s digital world, direct mail marketing remains one of the most viable and proven strategies to connect with customers.

Active Learning Approach:
By assuming the role of a direct mail marketing manager, students start off with $20,000. They are then tasked with developing a strategy by finding mailing lists that will produce sufficient sales, using confidence intervals to determine which lists to use to reach their $40,000 goal.

They win when they correctly formulate which questions they need to solve, collect the data, and analyze the data to evaluate potential risk and profitability for each mailing list.

Learn Key Concepts:
The game provides an environment in which students apply statistical concepts while making business decisions. They also learn the following:

  • Confidence intervals
  • Experimentation
  • Statistical analysis
  • Inference

3. Estimating Population Proportions

estimatingpopulationproportions

Relevant Application:
Students might not realize at first how many decisions involve measurements of a population attribute. For example, television stations base advertising charges on
ratings that reflect the percentage of viewers who watch a particular show. Political analysts are concerned with the fraction of voters who prefer a certain candidate. No
matter the field, estimating population proportions gives us greater insight into the data given to us.

Active Learning Approach:
In the game, students see a box filled with red and blue balls, and are asked to estimate the proportion of red balls in the population. They can draw sample sizes of 20, 50, or
100 to help them estimate the population proportion.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Determine the minimum sample size for a particular confidence level.
  • Construct a confidence interval for a population proportion.

4. Central Limit Theorem with Proportions

Relevant Application:
In many decisions, the variable of interest is a proportion. A university may want to know the fraction of first-year students with low grades in order to provide more support and resources for them. Manufacturers may be concerned with the fraction of parts that are defective.

Active Learning Approach:
Students see a box of red and blue balls, then draw three samples to calculate the sample proportions for each sample taken. Students draw samples again after being informed that samples of first 20 balls and then 40 balls were drawn 200 times to determine the proportion of the number of red balls to the total number of balls chosen. Students then view the data, including tables and histograms, to understand that the sampling distribution of the sampling proportion is approximately normal.

Learn Key Concepts:
Determine p-hat using the Central Limit Theorem for population proportions.

SIMULATIONS

1. Name That Distribution

namethatdistribution

Relevant Application:
This concept builder strengthens analytical skills in distribution recognition and data analysis. By detecting symmetric or skewed data, students will begin to understand how to apply this knowledge in the real world.

Active Learning Approach:
Students are asked to identify the type of distribution from a given histogram, frequency/relative frequency distribution, statistics table, or set of sample data. They
can increase the number of intervals on the histogram or frequency distribution, view different sample displays, or choose to view a hint before submitting their answer.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Analyze the histogram, frequency, statistics, and sample data of a distribution.
  • Identify different distribution types: uniform, normal, exponential, chi-square, Poisson, and mystery.

2. Central Limit Theorem

The simulation can run automatically and in bursts. This image shows histograms for n=5, n=15, and n=30. It includes the histogram of the parent function.

Relevant Application:
This simulation shows students how to use samples to make useful predictions about a population. Since many population sizes are too large to have their data collected and analyzed, we turn to the Central Limit Theorem for help.

The visual nature of this simulation lets students truly comprehend how the sample means from any population are normally distributed, regardless of the original
population’s distribution.

Active Learning Approach:
Students select a parent distribution and set the sample sizes and the burst rate. They choose the desired distribution type: exponential, chi-square, normal, Poisson, or bi-modal. Students can decide to run the simulation a set number of times or automatically, which will keep the simulation running.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Sample population
  • Mean
  • Variance
  • Standard deviation
  • Distribution type

3. Type II Error

You can select the plus or minus buttons for alpha, true mean, and sample size to change the graph. The shaded part increases or decreases depending on the number, and the bell curve moves forward or backward when you change the true mean.

Relevant Application:
Understanding hypothesis testing and type II error is essential to fields like evidence-based medicine, quality engineering, and reliability engineering, among others.

Active Learning Approach:
The variance, hypotheses, and critical values are given. Students can increase or decrease the level of significance (α), true mean (μ), and sample size to see how these
changes affect the other factors involved.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Examine the interrelationship between α, sample size, and β (the probability of making a type II error).
  • Develop an understanding of the concept of type II errors and the calculation of beta.
  • Explore the relationship between α and β.

 


Are you an instructor who would like to explore these lessons further?

Sign up for FREE student access today!

Additional Questions in Foundations of English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for Foundations of English. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to reading skills and grammar & mechanics. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 21
22
23
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25
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31
32
33
34
35
36
37
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45
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4.6 15
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25
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27
28
4.7 18
19
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4.8 12
13
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4.12 19
20
5.6 30

Additional Questions in English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for English Composition. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to different parts of the essay, critical reading & writing skills, and more. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
1.1 12
13
14
15
1.2 11
12
13
14
15
1.3 11
12
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14
15
1.4 11
12
13
14
15
1.5 11
12
13
1.6 11
12
13
14
15
1.7 11
12
13
14
15
1.8 11
12
13
14
15
1.9 14
15
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
2.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.1 11
12
13
14
15
3.2 11
12
13
14
15
3.3 13
14
15
3.4 11
12
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14
15
3.5 11
12
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14
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3.6 11
12
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14
15
4.1 11
12
13
14
15
4.2 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 11
12
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14
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4.4 11
12
13
14
15
4.5 11
12
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14
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4.6 11
12
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14
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5.1 11
12
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14
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5.2 13
14
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5.3 11
12
13
14
15
5.4 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
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14
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5.5 11
12
13
14
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5.6 11
12
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14
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5.7 11
12
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14
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5.8 11
12
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5.9 11
12
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5.10 11
12
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6.1 6
7
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9
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6.2 6
7
8
9
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6.3 11
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6.4 11
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6.5 6
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6.6 11
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6.7 11
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6.8 6
7
8
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7.1 9
10

Upgraded Assignment Reviewer

**COMING SOON**

Soon, you’ll be able to view student grades on both lessons and WebTests, including question statistics, from one centralized location: Assignment Reviewer.

The Assignments tab in the Hawkes Grade Book is shown, with the link to Assignment Reviewer circled.

When you open up Assignment Reviewer, you’ll be able to sort assignments by lessons or WebTests. Each assignment is listed, along with scores.

You can view question statistics to see how much of your class answered each question correctly, helping you assess whether you need to go over certain concepts again in the next class. You can also check out the average time spent on each question, giving you further insight into which concepts students struggle with the most.

When you look at students’ performance at Certifies, you can quickly see who mastered the lesson and who hasn’t, as well as the number of attempts.

When a student attempts a Certify, you can see exactly how they answered each question. Just select their name from the list to see an overall report of the Certify session.

Once you choose the Review Attempt button, you’ll see exactly how the student answered each question. Use the drop-down menu at the top of the page to easily navigate to any questions the student answered incorrectly.

This tool helps you keep track of performance on both individual student and overall class levels. For more information, call us at 1-800-426-9538.