Use this grammar diagnostic test to target which lessons students must master.

Customize the way students learn.

Save class time and identify individual areas of weakness for remediation with Hawkes Learning’s free grammar diagnostic test! Click through a demonstration of the test at your own pace.

This 50-question assessment identifies areas of proficiency and specific knowledge gaps for individual students. A customized curriculum is developed for each student to strengthen their grammar skills and eliminate those errors from their writing.

A report shows student progress in both a pie chart and bar graph. The part of the graphs in green represents the number of correct answers, while pink represents the number of incorrect answers. The bar graph breaks down each lesson number.

The tailored learning path through the grammar curriculum provides students the opportunity to learn, practice, and then master each topic. Let Hawkes assist you in ensuring these skills become second nature for your students, helping them become more effective communicators of their ideas.

While diagnostic tests are pre-created to save you time for both Hawkes Learning’s Foundations of English and English Composition courses, you can also customize either by removing or adding questions based on your own lesson objectives.

As you click through the demonstration here, you’ll see how students access their assessment, answer questions, and receive a performance breakdown of each topic covered in the test.


Want to see more? Contact your Hawkes courseware specialist at 1-800-426-9538 or sales@hawkeslearning.com today!

Missouri Math Pathways Initiative and Hawkes Learning

Below is information about the Hawkes materials regarding the new Missouri Math Pathways Initiative. We know this is an incredibly important topic of conversation across the state, and our goal is to deliver a curriculum uniquely designed to better prepare students for college-level math in Missouri.

New Missouri Pathways:

Pathway Corresponding Hawkes Text
Mathematical Reasoning and Modeling Viewing Life Mathematically
Precalculus Algebra Precalculus
Precalculus Precalculus
Statistical Reasoning Beginning Statistics
Pathway Corresponding Hawkes Text as a Corequisite
Mathematical Reasoning and Modeling Viewing Life Mathematically Plus Integrated Review
Precalculus Algebra College Algebra Plus Integrated Review
Precalculus Precalculus
Statistical Reasoning Beginning Statistics Plus Integrated Review

Hawkes Courseware

Hawkes courseware ensures students achieve mastery of course content through multimedia-rich lessons, unlimited practice problems with intelligent tutoring, and competency-based Certify assignments.

Chapter projects, simulations, and real-world games promote collaboration and show students the practical side of mathematics through activities using real-world applications of concepts taught. Offerings include new corequisite-ready courses that integrate foundational skills necessary for success in curriculum content.

Check out these two quick videos to learn more:

Mastery Learning:

Explain Error:


Quick Links

Request a review copy here.

Sign up for a demonstration of the accompanying courseware here.

Interactive and Relevant Applications of Statistics

Hawkes statistics courses include games and simulations that help students apply key concepts to the world outside of the classroom. Check these out below! If you’re an instructor who would like to explore these games and simulations yourself, sign up for free student access today.

1. Games of Chance

gamesofchance2

Relevant Application:
This lesson helps students apply the concept of the expected value of a random variable to winning or losing games. Students develop a rational approach to analyzing decisions that involve risk. After all, many business decisions—such as purchasing new equipment, hiring additional employees, and expanding into new markets—involve some kind of risk, and students need to assess these situations as best as they can.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Basic probability distribution
  • Binomial distribution function
  • Hypergeometric distribution function

2. Direct Mail

directmail2

Relevant Application:
Even in today’s digital world, direct mail marketing remains one of the most viable and proven strategies to connect with customers.

Active Learning Approach:
By assuming the role of a direct mail marketing manager, students start off with $20,000. They are then tasked with developing a strategy by finding mailing lists that will produce sufficient sales, using confidence intervals to determine which lists to use to reach their $40,000 goal.

They win when they correctly formulate which questions they need to solve, collect the data, and analyze the data to evaluate potential risk and profitability for each mailing list.

Learn Key Concepts:
The game provides an environment in which students apply statistical concepts while making business decisions. They also learn the following:

  • Confidence intervals
  • Experimentation
  • Statistical analysis
  • Inference

3. Estimating Population Proportions

estimatingpopulationproportions

Relevant Application:
Students might not realize at first how many decisions involve measurements of a population attribute. For example, television stations base advertising charges on
ratings that reflect the percentage of viewers who watch a particular show. Political analysts are concerned with the fraction of voters who prefer a certain candidate. No
matter the field, estimating population proportions gives us greater insight into the data given to us.

Active Learning Approach:
In the game, students see a box filled with red and blue balls, and are asked to estimate the proportion of red balls in the population. They can draw sample sizes of 20, 50, or
100 to help them estimate the population proportion.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Determine the minimum sample size for a particular confidence level.
  • Construct a confidence interval for a population proportion.

4. Central Limit Theorem with Proportions

Relevant Application:
In many decisions, the variable of interest is a proportion. A university may want to know the fraction of first-year students with low grades in order to provide more support and resources for them. Manufacturers may be concerned with the fraction of parts that are defective.

Active Learning Approach:
Students see a box of red and blue balls, then draw three samples to calculate the sample proportions for each sample taken. Students draw samples again after being informed that samples of first 20 balls and then 40 balls were drawn 200 times to determine the proportion of the number of red balls to the total number of balls chosen. Students then view the data, including tables and histograms, to understand that the sampling distribution of the sampling proportion is approximately normal.

Learn Key Concepts:
Determine p-hat using the Central Limit Theorem for population proportions.

SIMULATIONS

1. Name That Distribution

namethatdistribution

Relevant Application:
This concept builder strengthens analytical skills in distribution recognition and data analysis. By detecting symmetric or skewed data, students will begin to understand how to apply this knowledge in the real world.

Active Learning Approach:
Students are asked to identify the type of distribution from a given histogram, frequency/relative frequency distribution, statistics table, or set of sample data. They
can increase the number of intervals on the histogram or frequency distribution, view different sample displays, or choose to view a hint before submitting their answer.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Analyze the histogram, frequency, statistics, and sample data of a distribution.
  • Identify different distribution types: uniform, normal, exponential, chi-square, Poisson, and mystery.

2. Central Limit Theorem

The simulation can run automatically and in bursts. This image shows histograms for n=5, n=15, and n=30. It includes the histogram of the parent function.

Relevant Application:
This simulation shows students how to use samples to make useful predictions about a population. Since many population sizes are too large to have their data collected and analyzed, we turn to the Central Limit Theorem for help.

The visual nature of this simulation lets students truly comprehend how the sample means from any population are normally distributed, regardless of the original
population’s distribution.

Active Learning Approach:
Students select a parent distribution and set the sample sizes and the burst rate. They choose the desired distribution type: exponential, chi-square, normal, Poisson, or bi-modal. Students can decide to run the simulation a set number of times or automatically, which will keep the simulation running.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Sample population
  • Mean
  • Variance
  • Standard deviation
  • Distribution type

3. Type II Error

You can select the plus or minus buttons for alpha, true mean, and sample size to change the graph. The shaded part increases or decreases depending on the number, and the bell curve moves forward or backward when you change the true mean.

Relevant Application:
Understanding hypothesis testing and type II error is essential to fields like evidence-based medicine, quality engineering, and reliability engineering, among others.

Active Learning Approach:
The variance, hypotheses, and critical values are given. Students can increase or decrease the level of significance (α), true mean (μ), and sample size to see how these
changes affect the other factors involved.

Learn Key Concepts:

  • Examine the interrelationship between α, sample size, and β (the probability of making a type II error).
  • Develop an understanding of the concept of type II errors and the calculation of beta.
  • Explore the relationship between α and β.

 


Are you an instructor who would like to explore these lessons further?

Sign up for FREE student access today!

Instructor advice on motivating students

Having trouble motivating your students to stay active and engaged in class? We understand that some days, it can be a struggle. Current and former instructors here at Hawkes Learning have provided advice on how to keep students motivated. Check it out below, then let us know what advice YOU have!

In-class

  • Consider announcing a 3-point bonus question before your first test, and make it a scavenger hunt. Ask for three things (one point each): 1. What is written on your office door? (This encourages students to find your office.) 2. What is one name of a tutor in the tutoring lab? (This encourages them to find the tutoring lab.) 3. What are the hours for the tutoring lab? (This knowledge helps them if they need to schedule an appointment.)
  • Take attendance. Even if attendance isn’t part of the grade, it shows students that you’re aware whether or not they come to class and participate.
  • Get students to speak. A few will always take the lead and constantly ask questions, while some will never open their mouths. Directly ask those students a question. Hearing their voice and knowing it’s being heard has a positive effect and can lead them to speak up without being prompted later on.

Online

  • Post discussions and message boards. Since you can’t talk face-to-face, the next best thing is to utilize these communications threads.
  • Remind students that they never stop learning because technology changes so often. Use the online environment to your advantage by showing students new communications tools and apps that they can adapt to and learn from.
  • Hold virtual office hours for students who have questions or need a little extra help.

Math

  • Have a large class? Consider the “shared birthday” problem. A class of 30 students has over a 70% chance of having at least one shared birthday among them. A class of 40 students has almost 90%. If you happen to have one or more shared birthdays in the class, they never forget it and it gets them interested from the start.
  • Collect noninvasive data from your class to use throughout the semester. Asking at the beginning of the term for information like students’ majors, favorite sport, and number of siblings gives you data to incorporate in your lessons that will keep students interested.
  • Math courses have historically had a stigma for math anxiety for some students. Be reassuring and encouraging to your students, and provide opportunities for success that will help supply confidence and a positive momentum through the course.

English

  • Give students options! Anytime students can decide on an element of their learning, they get more invested in the outcome. Let them choose a project partner, reading selection, or project option.
  • Allow students to revise and resubmit assignments based on your feedback to improve their grades and strengthen their learning.
  • Put students in the role of instructor. Assign them a reading passage that they are responsible for teaching to part or all of the class. Teaching is the best way to learn a new concept!

Have more tips? We’d love to hear them! Comment below with your tried and true tips on keeping students motivated and engaged.

Additional Questions in Foundations of English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for Foundations of English. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to reading skills and grammar & mechanics. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
4.6 15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
4.7 18
19
20
4.8 12
13
14
15
16
4.12 19
20
5.6 30

Additional Questions in English Composition

New questions are available in the curriculum for English Composition. We’ve expanded the question bank so that you can assign more material related to different parts of the essay, critical reading & writing skills, and more. Check out which questions are new below, then assign them using the Assignment Builder in your Hawkes Grade Book!

Lesson Question Serial No.
1.1 12
13
14
15
1.2 11
12
13
14
15
1.3 11
12
13
14
15
1.4 11
12
13
14
15
1.5 11
12
13
1.6 11
12
13
14
15
1.7 11
12
13
14
15
1.8 11
12
13
14
15
1.9 14
15
2.1 11
12
13
14
15
2.2 11
12
13
14
15
2.3 11
12
13
14
15
2.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.1 11
12
13
14
15
3.2 11
12
13
14
15
3.3 13
14
15
3.4 11
12
13
14
15
3.5 11
12
13
14
15
3.6 11
12
13
14
15
4.1 11
12
13
14
15
4.2 11
12
13
14
15
4.3 11
12
13
14
15
4.4 11
12
13
14
15
4.5 11
12
13
14
15
4.6 11
12
13
14
15
5.1 11
12
13
14
15
5.2 13
14
15
5.3 11
12
13
14
15
5.4 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
5.5 11
12
13
14
15
5.6 11
12
13
14
15
5.7 11
12
13
14
15
5.8 11
12
13
14
15
5.9 11
12
13
14
15
5.10 11
12
13
14
15
6.1 6
7
8
9
10
6.2 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
6.3 11
12
13
14
15
6.4 11
12
13
14
15
6.5 6
7
8
9
10
6.6 11
12
13
14
15
6.7 11
12
13
14
15
6.8 6
7
8
9
10
7.1 9
10