Meet Our Student Ambassadors for Spring 2019

Hawkes Learning teams up with students across the country to help those who are new to using Hawkes. Through this internship, ambassadors meet with their peers to provide one-on-one guidance to answer many Hawkes questions, such as how to register a license number, where to go to complete homework, how to create a practice test, and what tools are the most helpful to get a good grade. Below are a few of the bright and talented students we work with!


Student Ambassadors Spring 2019 - Kayla

 

Kayla is a nursing major who studies at Bowie State University. She currently secured a 4.0 GPA for the first semester of her freshman year. She also enjoys music, mathematics, and intellectual conversations on current political issues. This devoted and ambitious individual hopes to gain an abundance of knowledge in the medical field so she can help others.

 


Student Ambassadors Spring 2019 - AdamAdam is a sophomore at Virginia Tech and he is a double major in Accounting and Business Information Technology. His favorite class is Intermediate Accounting and he currently holds a 3.96 GPA. Adam’s main goal after graduating is to earn his CPA certification and work at a CPA firm in Norfolk, VA. Outside of class, Adam is a brother of the international business fraternity Sigma Omega Upsilon; he also enjoys volunteering with his friends over in Circle K International. Some of Adam’s hobbies include PC gaming, Hokie football, listening to classic rock and collecting antiques.


Student Ambassadors Spring 2019 - LacyLacy is a freshman at Potomac State College who is majoring in Elementary Education. She is planning on attending West Virginia University in the fall of 2019 and planning to graduate in the Spring of 2022. Her favorite class is Education Colloquium and she currently holds a 3.81 GPA. Outside of school, she is very involved in her hometown’s 4-H club where she enjoys helping the younger members, showing and caring for animals, and interacting with anyone who may have a question. After graduation, she hopes to find a job in an elementary school in her hometown as a kindergarten or first-grade teacher.


Student Ambassador 6 - Kaitlin

Kaitlin is a sophomore finance major at the University of Mississippi. Although she is very busy with her studies, demonstrated by her 3.8 GPA, Kaitlin is involved in many organizations throughout campus. Some of her favorites include Alpha Omicron Pi, Associated Student Body, Students Activities Association, and Reformed University Fellowship, and Ole Miss Diamond Girls. This semester she is really enjoying her Business Calculus class. Upon graduating, Kaitlin plans to attend graduate school and become an external business consultant.

Delve into class and student performance with Assignment Reviewer

Detailed performance reporting and analytics allow you to keep a finger on the pulse of your classroom.

Assignment Reviewer gives you not only a big-picture overview of class performance on assignments, but also a more in-depth look at performance on a per-student and per-question basis.

Key features of Assignment Reviewer:

  • Identify most commonly missed questions on each assignment.
  • Check only one location for lesson-based AND WebTest-based data.
  • Analyze data on a per-student and per-question basis.
  • Check the due date status for any assignment.
  • See the average time spent by your class in Learn, Practice, and Certify.

When you enter Assignment Reviewer from your Grade Book (Assignments tab > Assignment Reviewer), select a class section to immediately view how many students completed the lessons you’ve assigned, or select the WebTests tab to see completion data on tests or quizzes.

Bar graph titled Submission Status, with the x-axis labeled Assignments and the y-axis labeled Students. The green parts of each bar show that the assignment is done; the yellow parts show that it is done late; and the orange parts are marked as overdue.

 

See how many students in your course completed each lesson or WebTest, as well as average time-on-task data.

Chart with hyperlinked Assignment Names with the following criteria next to them: Certified, Average Learn (Minutes), Average Practice (Minutes), and Average Certify (Minutes).

 

When you select a hyperlinked lesson, you can sort by assignment status to get a clear view of which students have mastered the lesson and which students haven’t.

Chart showing student name, email, score, due date, and number of attempts.

 

Need to review an individual student’s assignment? Select a hyperlinked lesson and then the student’s name from the list to view each question they received in Certify or on their WebTest, as well as an overview of their performance.

Certify overview for an individual student.

 

You also have the ability to see question statistics under the Analytics tab. Find out how many students answered each question correctly or incorrectly, the question’s level of difficulty, and the average time spent on each question. Select a serial number to see a preview of the question type your students are struggling with.

This feature allows you to identify the most commonly missed questions for every assignment. You can bring up this part of the report in class to review difficult questions with your students and guide discussion.

Under the Analytics tab, a bar graph showing the percentage of correctly and incorrectly answered questions.

A chart shows the question number, its objective, level of difficulty, if correct/incorrect, and average time spent (in minutes).

 

Select a question’s serial number for a preview of the question type students received in their assignment.

Sample question pop-up window labeled Question 2. Question asks, "Identify the following number. Choose all that apply: -1/7." Multiple choice answers include natural number, whole number, integer, rational number, irrational number, real number, and undefined.

 

As you can see, this tool helps you efficiently identify who is struggling and what they’re struggling with so that you’re able to even more effectively help those students.


Questions about Assignment Reviewer? Contact your Training & Support Specialist at 1-800-426-9538 or training@hawkeslearning.com.

Answer Equivalence in Calculus Courseware

We know that oftentimes in calculus, there’s more than one way to solve a problem. While some online systems don’t allow for multiple correct answers, Hawkes Learning’s courseware was built by subject matter experts who painstakingly went through examples to ensure students are given credit for equivalent answers.

Marvin, one of our lead calculus content editors, explained why it’s so important to include equivalent answers in the courseware: “There are often different methods of solving, and we don’t want to penalize students for getting a correct answer. When that happens, students get frustrated and doubt themselves. We want to boost their confidence.”

Our calculus subject matter experts Marvin and Claudia shared a few examples that show our courseware giving credit for correct alternative answers.

Sample Problem from Trigonometric Integrals

The first two correct answers are generated using Method 1 of solving, while the next three are generated using Method 2 of solving.

Problem

Evaluate the indefinite integral ∫ 7tan(4x)sec6(4x)dx. Use C for the constant of integration. Write the exact answer. Do not round.

Correct Answer 1

Method 1: We can use u-substitution with u = sec(4x) after rewriting the integral as
7 ∫ sec5(4x) · sec(4x)tan(4x)dx. Note that the answer has the fraction 7/24 as the coefficient of the secant function.

clc3-1.png

Correct Answer 2

Method 1: We can use u-substitution with u = sec(4x) after rewriting the integral as
7 ∫ sec5(4x) · sec(4x) tan(4x)dx. Note that the answer has the secant function as part of the numerator of the answer.

clc3-2.png

Correct Answer 3

Method 2: We can use u-substitution with u = tan(4x) after rewriting the integral as
7 ∫ tan(4x) [1 + tan2(4x)]2sec2(4x)dx. Note that the answer has several terms with tangent and fractional coefficients.

clc3-3.png

Correct Answer 4

Method 2: We can use u-substitution with u = tan(4x) after rewriting the integral as
7 ∫ tan(4x) [1 + tan2(4x)]2sec2(4x)dx. Note that the answer has the fraction 7/8 factored out.

clc3-4.png

Correct Answer 5

Method 2: We can use u-substitution with u = tan(4x) after rewriting the integral as
7 ∫ tan(4x) [1 + tan2(4x)]2sec2(4x)dx. Note that the answer has the fraction 7tan2(4x)/8 factored out.

clc3-5.png

Correct Answers 6 & 7

If students rewrite the integrand in terms of sine and cosine and work it out correctly, credit is also given.

Below are two examples of a student answering the problem using cos(4x).

1clc.jpg

 

2clc.jpg


Sample Problem from The Chain Rule

This question shows the application of the Chain Rule, and the correct answer can be written in different ways as shown below.

Problem

Find the derivative of the function F(x) = – 3(13 + 2√x)-5.

Correct Answer 1

The student applies the Chain Rule and writes the last factor as 1/√x.

clc1-1.png

Correct Answer 2

The student applies the Chain Rule and writes the last factor as x -1/2.

clc1-2.png

Correct Answer 3

The student applies the Chain Rule and rewrites the square root of x in terms of fractional exponents.

clc1-3.png

Correct Answer 4

The student applies the Chain Rule and rewrites the whole answer as one fraction using the positive exponent 6 for the expression in parentheses.

clc1-4.png

Correct Answer 5

The student applies the Chain Rule and rewrites the answer as one fraction using the exponent of negative 6 for the expression in parentheses.

clc1-5.png


Sample Problem from Integration by Parts

Problem

Evaluate the integral ∫(t + 1)e4tdt. Use C for the constant of integration. Write the exact answer. Do not round. (Hint: Use an alternative method if integration by parts is not required.)

Correct Answer 1

The student applies integration by parts and writes the answer obtained by evaluating
uv – ∫ v du.

clc2-1.png

Correct Answer 2

The student applies integration by parts and writes the answer as one fraction with the common denominator and e4t factored out.clc2-2.png

Correct Answer 3

The student applies integration by parts and writes the answer with e4t factored out but no common denominator for the fractions.clc2-3.png


calc-book-and-computer.gif

 

Interested in seeing more of the calculus courseware? Contact us today at info@hawkeslearning.com or 1-800-426-9538 to get free access to the student courseware!

Inside Our Calculus Courseware: Trigonometric Substitutions

The word “Trigonometric” by itself scares students. Combining it with “Substitutions and Evaluation” is downright terrifying. After all, the student must select the appropriate substitution, transform the integrand from an algebraic to a trigonometric expression, make the appropriate change in limits of integration (or rewrite their antiderivative in terms of the original variable), and finally evaluate the antiderivative. There are pitfalls everywhere along the way. One thing students often fail to do is carry out the last step and evaluate the integral because they’re so relieved to have found the antiderivative.

Sample Problem #1

Below is an example of this problem type and ways we show students how to avoid those common pitfalls:

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-1.png

Step-by-Step

In the Practice mode, students have access to learning aids to help them understand how to tackle each problem. For example, they can choose Step-by-Step in the Tutor area.

This tool provides a step-by-step breakdown of the problem, walking the student through the problem in manageable pieces. While it provides plenty of guidance, the Step-by-Step portion does ask the student to input the results of each step so they are learning as they go.

In Step 1, since the integrand does not exactly match any of the expressions corresponding to a trigonometric substitution, specifically the expression under the radical, the student is asked to identify the equivalent form of that expression after it has been rewritten by completing the square.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-2.png

In Step 2, the student will identify the limits of integration after the first change in variable.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-3.png

In Step 3, the student will identify the trigonometric substitution.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-4.png

In Step 4, the student calculates the differential dt in terms of the new variable θ after the substitution in Step 3.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-4-of7 (002).png

In Step 5, the student will identify the limits of integration in terms of θ resulting from the trigonometric substitution.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-6.png

In Step 6, the student is prompted to simplify the integrand if the absolute value can be removed. The condition for which this is possible is verified.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-7.png

In Step 7, the student will find and evaluate the antiderivative. There is no need to rewrite the antiderivative in terms of the original variable since the limits of integration have been rewritten at each step in terms of the new variables when new variables were introduced. Because of this, taking the antiderivative and evaluating it is straightforward.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-8.png

 


Sample Problem #2

Students often are so relieved at finally having found the antiderivative, they fail to take the final step and evaluate that antiderivative for a definite integral. The following Explain Error example notes when this occurs and prompts the student to take that final step.

The correct but unevaluated antiderivative is entered.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-9.png

Students can select the Explain Error option to receive precise feedback from the system’s artificial intelligence. This tool anticipates and diagnoses specific errors, stopping students in their tracks and showing them not only that their answer is incorrect, but why it is incorrect.

Here, we note the correct but unevaluated antiderivative has been entered as the answer.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-10.png

The student then returns to Practice mode, evaluates the result at the limits of integration, and completes the question.

CLC-CLCSV-7.4-11.png

 


Calc Book and Computer

 

Interested in seeing more of the calculus question bank? Contact us today at info@hawkeslearning.com or 1-800-426-9538 to get free access to the student courseware!