New graphing questions for microeconomics students

Hawkes Learning’s Principles of Microeconomics homework and testing platform provides new user-directed graphing that doesn’t rely on Flash or plugins.

These graphing questions enforce deeper learning, provide step-by-step tutorials, and offer specific feedback through an interactive experience!

Question: Suppose you face the following market for coffee. Graph what changes this causes in the market by shifting the appropriate curve and plotting the new equilibrium point.

This summer, we’re releasing more graphing questions throughout the software. Here’s a sneak peak of upcoming graphing question types that will be ready for fall:

  • Start from scratch and plot the supply and demand curves
  • Plot producer and consumer surplus, then calculate each surplus
  • Plot price floors and price ceilings
  • Use graphing for different market structures, such as monopoly and monopolistic competition

Want to see more?

Contact us today at 1-800-426-9538 or sales@hawkeslearning.com to start exploring these graphing questions in Chapter 3: Demand and Supply.


Principles of Microeconomics in iPad

Principles of Microeconomics helps students gain a broad understanding of microeconomics concepts. Through multimodal instruction, interactive practice, and real-world examples, students learn to think as economists and apply basic micro principles to the situations around them.

Table of Contents:
0. Math Review
1. Welcome to Economics
2. Choice in a World of Scarcity
3. Demand and Supply
4. Labor and Financial Markets
5. Elasticity
6. Consumer Choices
7. Production, Costs, and Industry
Structure
8. Perfect Competition
9. Monopoly
10. Monopolistic Competition and
Oligopoly
11. Monopoly and Antitrust Policy
12. Environmental Protection and Negative Externalities
13. Positive Externalities and Public Goods
14. Labor Markets and Income
15. Poverty and Economic
Inequality
16. Information, Risk, and
Insurance
17. Financial Markets
18. Public Economy
19. International Trade
20. Globalization and
Protectionism

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