Evidence continues to show corequisite effectiveness

[Originally published on Inside Higher Ed]

Alexandra Logue, a research professor at the Center for Advanced Study in Education at the City University of New York Graduate Center, describes an effective implementation of the corequisite model at City University of New York. This study adds to the growing body of research on the benefits of corequisite remediation.

According to Logue, “Currently, around 68 percent of new college freshmen in public community colleges and 40 percent in public four-year colleges take at least one remedial course in reading, writing or mathematics (somewhat more often in math), but most students assigned to remediation either never take a course or don’t complete it.” She cites several other studies that have shown higher course pass rates in corequisite remedial courses than in traditional remedial courses and argues that the educational community has a responsibility to look seriously at corequisite classes.

At City University of New York in a randomized controlled trial, students benefited from corequisite remediation over traditional remediation. Logue suggests some possible explanations, “including the incorrect assignment of some students to remediation, the demotivating effect of being assigned to traditional remediation, the extra time and cost to students if they must take traditional remedial courses, the greater number of potential exit points from traditional remediation course sequences, and so on.”

Read this article on Inside Higher Ed.


Logue, Alexandra W. “The Extensive Evidence of Co-Requisite Remediation’s Effectiveness.” Inside Higher Ed, Inside Higher Ed, 17 July 2018, www.insidehighered.com/views/2018/07/17/data-already-tell-us-how-effective-co-requisite-education-opinion. Accessed 20 August 2018.

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